Archive for October, 2013

How to use honey in your beauty regimen

       
Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

How to use honey in your beauty regimen

Honey makes a sweet addition to your tea and oatmeal, but have you ever considered including it in your beauty routine? Before you balk at using the sticky substance on your skin, consider that the it can hydrate your skin and promote a more radiant, supple complexion.

The perks
Women have been using a milk and honey mixture for a more youthful appearance since ancient times. WomenFitness.net noted that honey is packed with of vitamins and minerals, including calcium, copper, iron, niacin, riboflavin, magnesium, potassium and zinc, among others. Honey is also a natural humectant, so it acts as a magnet for moisture. Not only that, but it’s chock full of antioxidants, which can fight damage from free radicals and the sun’s rays. It’s also ideal for sensitive skin as it can relieve irritation.

Are you struggling with pesky breakouts? Honey may also be a viable solution for you. Benefits-of-Honey.com explained that because honey can soak up toxins from your pores, it acts as a deep cleanser, preventing blemishes.

The products
Considering the fact that cold, dry months are approaching, it’s the perfect time to think about incorporating honey into a few DIY beauty products. If your elbows, knees or other parts of your body are particularly flaky, Greatist suggested applying honey to the area and letting it absorb for 30 minutes before washing it off.

When your lips start to become chapped and peel in the winter, you could also concoct your own lip balm with honey at home. Lifehacker recommended mixing beeswax, sweet almond oil and honey into a paste. According to the source, you’ll see a major difference almost instantly.

If you’re ready to take advantage of honey’s inherent benefits in a bigger way, you can even infuse it into your entire skincare routine. Benefits-of-Honey.com advised making a gentle cleanser with 1/4 cup honey, 1 tablespoon liquid soap and 1/2 cup glycerin. A face sponge is the best way to evenly distribute the solution onto your face. Then rinse and dry with a towel. Honey is a great addition to your facial scrub because its soothing properties can counteract the harshness of the exfoliants. The website suggested mixing 1 tablespoon of honey with 1 tablespoon ground almonds, 2 tablespoons dry rolled oats and a dash of yogurt or lemon juice. Work the scrub onto your face and rinse off with warm water for softer, smoother skin. You could also combine 1 peeled, cored apple with a tablespoon of honey in a blender for a natural toner.

How stress is sabotaging your beauty

       
Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

How stress is sabotaging your beauty

There are obvious reasons to avoid stress, as it can do some serious damage to your body. Did you know that it affects your appearance as well?

Between work deadlines, social obligations, paying bills and taking care of other responsibilities, sometimes it’s inevitable to feel overwhelmed. However, you might want to consider ways to keep your calm once you realize the potential impact on your complexion. Here are just a few ways that stress is sabotaging your skin, hair and nails:

Wrinkles
It’s no secret that stress can affect mood and energy levels, but it also makes you look olde. Daily Makeover explained that when you’re under a lot of pressure, your body continually churns out cortisol, a hormone that can break down collagen – not to mention also make you gain weight. When your cortisol levels are high, it’s more difficult for the skin to reproduce elastin and repair damage, leading to faster formation of wrinkles. Dr. Doris Day told Woman’s Day that it can be helpful during a particularly stressful day to stop and take a deep breath, thereby relaxing the muscles in your face to prevent fine lines.

Puffy eyes
One of the major negative effects of stress is that it can disrupt your sleep, and as a result, you end up with tired, puffy eyes. Daily Makeover noted that when you don’t get the deep sleep you need, your body is unable to rid itself of excess liquids. Therefore, that fluid ends up settling in the undereye tissue, causing dark circles and bags. It’s crucial to get an adequate amount of shuteye, but when you still need some extra help, use a moisturizing eye cream and a yellow-based concealer to fake an awake look.

Breakouts
Unfortunately, you’re also more likely to get pesky blemishes and breakouts when you’re tense, which can be frustrating and exacerbate the problem. According to She Knows, one of the other effects of a spike in cortisol is increased oil production and an inability to control inflammation. Therefore, you’re a lot more likely to see redness and clogged pores. Skincare expert Lavinia Borcau recommended looking for cleansers and toners that are formulated with green tea or chamomile, both natural anti-inflammatories.

Dry skin
If your skin is looking flaky and feeling dry, stress might be the cause. Borcau told She Knows that when you’re especially strained, your skin can’t hold moisture as effectively. She suggested using a rich cream that contains shea butter and avocado oil. Not only will your complexion feel softer, but these ingredients can also act as a barrier from irritants, free radicals and bacteria in the environment.

Damaged nails
Your digits are also dealing with negative impacts when you’re under pressure – and not just because you might be nervously biting your fingernails. Dr. Flor Mayoral, dermatologist and clinical instructor from University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Fla., said that many people make a habit of pressing their fingers over their thumb nail, leading to a raised ridge in the center. On top of that, your nails may become weaker, peel or even begin to show white horizontal lines. When they’re looking particularly brittle, nix the lacquer for a week and brush on a strengthening treatment.

Hair loss
Is your hair starting to shed? Daily makeover explained that hair loss is another issue that can be caused by anxiety. Your hair follicles immediately go from a growth phase to a resting one. Dr. Mayoral noted that the “fall-out” phase that follows typically lasts for up to three months after a stressful time, and it can take six to nine months for the hair to re-grow. In the meantime, switch to a shampoo that can energize your scalp and a nourishing, thickening conditioner.