Archive for the ‘Redness & Irritation’ Category

Can you tell the difference between normal skin and sensitive skin?

       
Friday, November 16th, 2012

Can you tell the difference between normal skin and sensitive skin?Have you ever had a breakout or noticed patches of dry skin around your nose and wondered, "Does this mean I have sensitive skin?"

If so, you're not alone. Sensitive skin can be tough to define and, as a result, is one of the most misdiagnosed conditions in the beauty industry. While products like BABOR – Basic Care Sensitive Cream can be a great resource for those with sensitive complexions, this misunderstood skin dilemma is so confusing, even experts are weighing in.

"It's an overused phrase," Elizabeth Tanzi, M.D., co-director of the Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery in Washington, D.C, told Allure magazine. "People may be overusing their products, leading to irritation."

One of the best ways to tell if you legitimately have sensitive skin is to test out new products. If foundations, face washes and even blushes cause inflammation and make your skin sting, that's a pretty good sign that you have a sensitive epidermis.

If your skin does become red, something like BORGHESE – Effetto Immediato Spa Soothing Tonic for Sensitive Skin can soothe, condition and re-balance skin for a more luminous appearance. 

Three things you didn’t know about your cosmetics

       
Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Three things you didn't know about your cosmeticsWhether you just got home from work or you spent the evening partying it up with your best friends at a hotspot in the city, chances are you've got mascara, foundation and other leftover cosmetics still lingering on your visage.

Before you hit the sheets, it's important to remove your makeup – but did you know that there's more to it than simply splashing water on your face? Consider these three facts the next time you're scrubbing your cosmetics away.

1. Each day, your face gets covered by debris. Whether you spend the day outside or just go out your door to grab the paper, your face is greeted with a hailstorm of pollutants each and every day. Between dirt, grime and your cosmetics, your skin can start to feel the pressure in a major way. A granule-free exfoliant can remove dead skin cells on the surface and leave your face feeling softer.

2. Bacteria and fungi live in cosmetics. It's kind of weird to think about, but bacteria – and yes, even fungi – infiltrate your beauty products on a regular basis. Mascara and even skin care creams are susceptible to this, so be check the expiration dates on all your products before you use them.

3. Leftover cosmetics can lead to infections. Sometimes, it's tempting to just hit the hay after a long day out and leave the work of removing makeup for the morning. But did you know that unremoved cosmetics – especially in the sensitive areas around your eyes – can lead to infections? To prevent this, make time every night to remove your makeup with a gentle, oil-free product designed to get rid of even the toughest cosmetics around your peepers.

Sensitive skin: Equal parts nature and nurture

       
Thursday, June 16th, 2011

Sensitive skin: Equal parts nature and nurtureChances are you’ve racked up plenty of experience telling the lady at the sales counter whether you’ve got normal, oily, dry or combination skin. But did you know that having sensitive skin isn’t always a result of what your mama gave you?

“According to experts, all of [the] popular high-tech potions and procedures [we use to whip our skin into shape] contribute to a gradual wearing down of the outer layers of skin, leading to an uptick in the number of people who suffer from continual redness and sensitivity issues,” StyleList.com reports.

This means there definitely can be “too much of a good thing” when it comes to exfoliators, anti-aging treatments and especially when it comes to using too many products all at once.

To combat this issue, we suggest talking to a skincare expert to determine your true skin type and sticking only to products designed for your dermis. Most skincare regimens don’t require more than the use of a cleanser, toner, moisturizer and/or night cream.

Treating uneven skin

       
Friday, October 29th, 2010

Treating uneven skinWhile many women yearn for a flawless complexion, some have uneven skin that can be hard to conceal, as one product may not even out the discoloration. However, Allure magazine recently revealed some ways that women can combat the issue.

If you have a complexion marked with dark spots, there are a few products that can remedy the problem. A cream that contains two percent hydroquinone, like Murad Age Spot and Pigment Lightening Gel, can help lightened darkened areas. The news source recommends applying the product at night, 20 minutes before your moisturizer.

Women with hyperpigmentation but sensitive skin may want to try a mild treatment. Look for formulas with kojic acid, such as Neova Kojic Complex Gel.

Whether you have a propensity for blushing or are afflicted with rosacea, facial redness can be combated at well. The news outlet recommends washing your face with a product meant for sensitive skin and moisturizing with a lotion that contains soothing ingredients such as feverfew, aloe vera and licorice.

Finally, a mask with sulfur, like Murad Clarifying Mask, can help reduce inflammation.

Tips on selecting skincare products based on your ethnicity

       
Friday, August 13th, 2010

Tips on selecting skincare products based on your ethnicityWhile skin color often dictates the shade of foundation that women wear, few ladies may be aware that one’s heritage can also dictate her skincare routine requirements. “Even beyond color, recent research shows that race and ethnicity play an important role in how the skin will respond to products and procedures,” Jessica Wu, clinical instructor of dermatology at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, told Allure magazine.

But finding the right types of products for your skin based on your ethnicity doesn’t have to be difficult – with a bit of advice from industry experts, it can be easy.

According to Fran Cook-Bolden, director of the Ethnic Skin Specialty Group in New York City, pigment-making cells are highly productive in black skin. “Harsh cleansers are just one more thing that can upset black skin and excite pigment cells,” Cook-Bolden told the news source.

A gentle face wash, like Dermalogica UltraCalming Cleanser, will clean skin without irritating chemicals that can cause inflammation. SkinMedica Skin Polisher features “ultrafine jojoba beads [that] allow you to use this [product] at least twice a week without irritation,” the publication reports.

Women who have white skin must deal with pigment issues of their own. The news outlet reports that white skin is prone to redness, sometimes caused by rosacea. Jeannette Graf, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, swears by B. Kamins Chemist Booster Blue Soothing Skin Concentrate. “I use this when my skin flares up with redness,” she told the magazine, as the blue-green tint counteracts redness while bisabolol tempers irritation.

“Rich moisturizers are a must, because as light skin thins, it gets drier,” added Graf. L’Occitane 24 Hours Ultra Rich Face Cream contains 25 percent shea butter and is formulated to help replenish skin’s hydrolipidic film.

According to Allure, South Asian and Middle Eastern women’s skin is susceptible to melasma and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. “As this skin ages, everything drops,” Hema Sundaram, a dermatologist and cosmetic surgeon, told the news provider, who recommends SkinMedica TNS Essential Serum. “There are good studies showing that it stimulates new collagen formation to improve elasticity and also helps with hyperpigmentation,” she added. “One Indian patient calls it ‘liquid gold for the skin.’”

Sundaram also recommends Colorescience Sunforgettable SPF 30. “This is the one sunscreen that really helps prevent my melasma – because it’s broad-spectrum, it’s easy to reapply and it gives complete coverage,” she told the magazine.

East Asian and Southeast Asian women should opt for exfoliants that boast lactic acid, like Kinerase Pro+Therapy Advanced Radiance Facial Peel, as Wu reports that lactic acid is less likely to irritate Asian skin than stronger salicylic acid.

“Studies show that Asian skin is more sensitive than other types,” Wu told the news source, adding that she usually recommends a soap-free cleanser. Exuviance Gentle Cleansing Creme is a soap-free formula designed to remove makeup, dirt and surface oils without stripping skin of lipids.

Latin ladies looking for clear skin, however, may want to select a treatment that contains salicylic acid. Because Latinas are a diverse mix of ethnicities, their skin can have issues associate with light complexions, like lines and rosacea, and dark skin, like melasma. Salicylic acid has anti-inflammatory properties, which benefits Latinas with rosacea. “[It] redistributes pigment, which makes the skin look more even-toned,” Vivian Bucay, dermatologist and clinical assistant professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, told the new source.

Murad offers a few products that contain salicylic acid. The brand’s Clarifying Cleanser boasts 1.5 percent salicylic acid and is formulated to eliminate surface bacteria. Their AHA/BHA Exfoliating Cleanser brightens skin by dissolving skin cell buildup, and features licorice extract, which is reported to have anti-irritant and anti-inflamatory properties.ADNFCR-3538-ID-19925048-ADNFCR

Say Goodbye to Shaving Irritations

       
Friday, April 13th, 2007

Shaving can be a pain—literally. A lot of men have problems with skin irritation on their neck and face after shaving (folliculitis). Some irritations are so painful that men can only shave once every six days; this is the only way to keep the event of irritation at a minimum. This doesn’t usually leave enough time for the face to heal completely.

Folliculitus is a public problem but there are things that you can do to relieve the situation:

  • Start by trimming your facial hair with an electric razor before using a regular razor.
  • Exfoliate with a gentle pre-shave exfoliator.
  • Then, use a rich, lubricating shave cream that has silicone technology, to prevent further irritation.
  • When finished shaving put a warm, moist towel on your face followed by a cold one—this will help pores to close.
  • Alleviate burning by using ice cold aloe gel (refrigerate before using).